The Rise and Fall of Indie Rock Icons Galaxie 500

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galax 385 The Rise and Fall of Indie Rock Icons Galaxie 500galax 125 The Rise and Fall of Indie Rock Icons Galaxie 500 [pullquote quote="One afternoon, I heard a demo from this group, the music was simple yet complex, it was beautiful and moved me like no other band."]Before coming to 93XRT, I had the honor and pleasure of working with a number of bands, many became household names and others mere blips in the rock world.

I was lucky enough to hear a 3 song demo cassette  of a trio of Harvard University students calling themselves [lastfm]Galaxie 500[/lastfm]. At the time, The Boston music scene was quite loud and fast, still very much caught up in the hardcore punk scene of the early to mid 80’s. The post punk sounds of The Pixie’s were just about to make waves overseas and then there was Galaxie 500. I was working for the Boston punk label TAANG! mainly focusing my energies on a young band called [lastfm]Lemonheads[/lastfm] and their first album Hate Your Friends.

One afternoon, I heard a demo from this group, the music was simple yet complex, it was beautiful and moved me like no other band had. I always believed my music world was so loud, that it took a band like Galaxie 500 to make stop, take pause and finally listen. I was so moved by the group and after a few meetings over bread pudding in a small diner in Cambridge, we all agreed I would fund the band’s 1st recordings. For roughly $500 and a heck of of lot of hard work and passion. The band released their debut album Today.

[pullquote quote="Recently, the band re-issued their recordings."]Galaxie 500 only released three proper studio albums. One for my  indie label Aurora and two for Rough Trade Records. The band split up or imploded and Dean Wareham went on to form [lastfm]Luna[/lastfm], while the drummer and bassist went their separate ways. As years passed, Galaxie 500 gained cult like status amongst indie rock music fans. Their records became quite collectable. Their influence still is cited by many of today’s groups. Recently, the band re-issued their recordings and one of their earliest fans and probably the group’s unofficial historian Mike McGonigal collected an oral history of the group for Pitchfork Magazine. You hear from the group itself and the others who surrounded them from the very beginning to the very end. Please take some time to discover a band that like others never reached mainstream success but their sounds not only live on but continue to influence others creating music we love and passionate about.  Temperature Rising: Galaxie 500 An Oral History

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